Reader of the Week: Shimshon Alpert

Have you read an article or dvar Torah on orot.com or watched a shiur that really got you thinking? Send us your reflections to info@orot.com and you may be the featured reader of the week!
Reader of the Week: Shimshon Alpert on “Yitsra de-Sin’at Hinam”
To read the article “Yitsra de-Sin’at Hinam,” click here

The only way to stop baseless hatred is to adopt the derech of R. Kook – baseless love. Maybe the haters will move toward the middle, which is a big step forward. But one must avoid the huge stumbling block: the conditionality that’s embedded within Judaism itself which encourages judgmentalism, criticism, self-righteousness, harshness, severity — all things that are connected to hatred and which are opposed to the most fundamental principal of the Torah, “love your neighbor as yourself.”
In essence, do not avoid Judaism, but rather the conditionality that’s embedded in Judaism. 
Shimshon Alpert

Reader of the Week: Greg Yashgur

Have you read an article or dvar Torah on orot.com or watched a shiur that really got you thinking? Send us your reflections to info@orot.com and you may be the featured reader of the week!
Reader of the Week: Greg Yashgur on “Yitsra de-Sin’at Hinam”
To read the article “Yitsra de-Sin’at Hinam,” click here

 

It is not hate, it is an observation. Zealousness in thinking that someone knows what G-d wants is the root cause of sinat chinam, the rest has reasons, so much for 24,000 R. Akiva’s students for who we still fast and for 6,000,000 Shoa victims for whom we do not.

My thinking is that if ‘derech eretz kodem Torah,’ basic midot (manners) and ethics must precede Torah learning; if that condition is not met, the edifice on flimsy foundation does not stand and will not stand.

The book of Genesis of Avot (fore-fathers) precedes the books of Commandments and for a reason. First ideals then commandments. Commandments without ideals are worthless.

No one can ban baseless hatred by decree. That is the whole point to understand that there is an evolution in civic conscience over period of human history and if we, Jews, have anything to say to the world, today, and if we want the world to hear, then we should embrace the world that also was created in G-d’s image and that this embrace is the foundation for a dialog. With no respect there is no equality and no dialog. We start from ourselves.

On the other hand if we are too premature with the message then it is false-Messianism. We accumulated too many klipot, impurities, that unless we seek the truth with our strengths, the situation will not improve.

Thank G-d that life is stronger than theory. The beginning of 20th century showed orthodoxy being decimated by influence of human endeavors and new thinking (of Rav Kook in particular) was planted. Same thing will happen again and something good again will be attained. Everything is evolving and will go through its dialectical iterations.

Let’s keep faith.

Greg Yashur